Reconstructing Assumptions

RETURN
edited 11/20/16

For each of the examples below representing a truncated argument (enthymeme) construct an additional sentence (or two) which could serve as a premise(s) that renders a valid (not necessarily sound) argument.

A needed assumption could be: Paraplegics cannot be not good lawyers.

(This in turn could be questioned to discover the assumptions underlying it.)

This requires more in the way of assumptions to render a valid argument.

Some might be:

  1. One personís getting hurt at an activity is sufficient evidence to judge that activity dangerous.
  2. John is a person and skiing is an activity.

These are sufficient to yield example B.

Remember: a valid argument is not necessarily a sound (or wise) one! (See An Introduction to Models of Reasoning)

 


Problems:

(See also, What's the Connection?)

1. You canít trust Dan. He hasnít paid me the money he owes me.

2. Samís nervousness shows heís a coward.

3. Apples are inedible. Theyíre made of granite.

4. John is an environmentalist, so he will vote against building the dam.

5. Olivia is a baker, so she canít dance.

6. Anne must be insane. She hums constantly.

7. Mary doesnít speak French. She must not be well-educated.

8. Phil is an epileptic. Thatís why he failed.

9. Johnís failure indicates his lack of dedication.

10. John must be a good teacher; heís such a caring person.

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